Part 1:

Because the reputation of God is at stake.

There is a glaring question in the Bible: Is God a covenant-keeping God?

In Genesis 12, God made an everlasting covenant with Abraham, and He confirmed it to Isaac and to Jacob.

However, there are a growing number of Christians today who dismiss Israel as a rejected and replaced people, considering God's promises to restore them to be null and void.

What happened? Did God go back on His promises?
Was He forced to give up on His covenant people and start from scratch? Does man’s faithlessness nullify the faithfulness of God?

It’s an important question to ask because the way God deals with Israel is the way that God deals with us. If He is able to forget His covenant with Israel, then He is also able to forget His covenant with us.

But that is not the character of God.

Paul wrestles with this question in Romans 9-11: “I ask, then, has God rejected his people? By no means!” (11:1) Why is Paul so convinced of this? Because he knows the character of God— “When we are faithless, he remains faithful— for he cannot deny himself.” (2 Timothy 2:13)

This is what leads the apostle Paul to declare: “For I tell you that the Messiah has become a servant of the Jews on behalf of God’s truth, so that the promises made to the patriarchs might be confirmed (Romans 15:8) Paul believed that in relation to the Jewish people “the gifts and calling of God are irrevocable.” (Romans 11:29)

There remains in the plan of God a promised restoration of Israel.

Part 2:

One God. One People.

There are many opinions today about who are the people of God.

Are there two “people of God?”
Is Israel His “chosen people”?
Is the Church His “chosen people”?
Or has the Church merely replaced Israel?
The Bible, however, describes the people of God as a
single olive tree
“You, although a wild olive shoot, have been grafted in among others and now share in the nourishing root of the olive tree, so do not be arrogant toward the branches. If you are, remember it is not you who support the root, but the root that supports you. (Romans 11:17-18)

If you have faith in the Messiah of Israel, you have been adopted into the family of God and share in the rich root of the Olive Tree.

“Remember that at one time you were separated from the Messiah, alienated from the commonwealth of Israel and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world. But now in the Messiah Jesus — you who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of the Messiah. (Ephesians 2:12-13)

Youshare in their

adoption. promises. history. covenants. Messiah.

As the church, let us not be arrogant and cut ourselves off from the the nourishing root. Instead, let us respond in humility.

Part 3:

Israel and the Nations: God's Great Plan of Salvation

What is God’s purpose for the relationship between Israel and the nations?

“So I ask, did they stumble in order that they might fall? By no means! Rather through their trespass salvation has come to the Gentiles… so as to make Israel jealous. (Romans 11:11)

Despite the controversy over the Messiah’s identity, the early followers of Jesus believed that one day Israel would welcome their Messiah.

“For if their rejection means the reconciliation of the world, what will their acceptance mean but life from the dead?” (Romans 11:15)

God has a unique role for the Gentiles in Israel’s restoration.

“And now the Lord says, who formed Me from the womb to be His Servant, to bring Jacob back to Him... Indeed He says, ‘It is too small a thing that you should be My Servant To raise up the tribes of Jacob, and to restore the preserved ones of Israel; I will also give You as a light to the Gentiles, that You should be My salvation to the ends of the earth.’” (Isaiah 49:5-6)

Through Israel, light has come to the world in the form of God's mercy.

Through the Gentiles showing Israel the same mercy, Israel's ongoing restoration becomes a blessing to the whole world.

Why would God choose to do things this way?

So that God’s love, mercy, and desire for reconciliation will be known by all.

He alone will receive all the glory.

Part 4:

The Two Shall Become One

The glory of God is most clearly seen in the reconciliation of Jew and Gentile together in one body.

“For [Jesus] himself is our peace, who has made us both one and has broken down in his flesh the dividing wall of hostility... that he might create in himself one new man in place of the two, so making peace (Ephesians 2:14-15)

“Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are his judgments and how inscrutable his ways!” (Romans 11:33)

This is why we care about Israel and the Jewish people.

You have an important role to play in their restoration.

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